The RE4 Remake Mistake



  • Rebuilding and updating classic videogames is a risky and ambitious endeavor. By trying to remake a game, you plan on breathing new life into an old entity, but at the same time, you are gambling with it, because you are threatening to turn away fans of the original, by remodeling the old and trying to make it new for newer audiences and money. It's a brave move to take, because while your intentions are to make the game better in the long run, you may find that what you're making is sucking the soul out of a beloved product. This is why the idiom "if it aint broke don't fix it exists", because you might find the results will suck more than a vampire kissing a vacuum cleaner.

    Right now, the remake is a popular trend to bring great games back to the limelight. The Resident Evil franchise for example, has been notorious for updating old entries ever since 2002, but this is because the emphasis with these remakes is on improving and modernizing the gameplay.

    We may all love the fixed cameras of old Resi outings, but we want to see the threats coming, we want the horrors to be visible to us so we can repel them. There is a sense that the modern Resident Evil remakes are geared more towards Hollywood-style action than they were in the deep past, but these reinventions allow us to love them all over again.

    The problem comes when there is seemingly no need for a remake. This appears to be the case with Resident Evil 4 remake, as the OG 2005 game is still regarded as arguably the best Resident Evil game-why would anyone mess with that? Resident Evil 4 looked great, was a daring and forward-thinking sequel that turned away from fixed cameras and gurgling zombies, for an over-the-shoulder third person perspective, and a new breed of menace The Ganados, who unlike zombies, can speak Spanish and hurl pitchforks.

    The threat with the RE4 Remake is it'll suck the particular pleasures of Resident Evil 4 out, and inject a standardized RE presentation as we've seen with the previous RE remakes. The worry is the characterful flourishes and jokes such as Leon's pondering "Where's everyone going, bingo?", will be jettisoned in favour of a level-headed alternative.

    Also at risk, are the athletic maneuvers Leon is capable of. Remember when Leon could badass-flip from a tower, or deliver sickening skull-squelching German Suplexes? If the remake omits these awesome traits that made RE4 what it was originally, that'd be an extreme form of besmirchment to the 2005 GOTY-level juggernaut.

    I don't believe the RE4 remake will retain the wonderful traits of the classic, but I do think the third-person shooting will be improved. Aiming and shooting is monotonous in the old RE4, where you can't move while aiming, so it's easier to be savaged by the Hispanic villagers. Considering the previous RE remakes, we will see satisfying shooting mechanics and taut controls-so I don't think it'll be an entirely needless remake.

    Generally, I don't think RE4 needs a remake, but it makes sense for Capcom to put one out there regardless. No, I don't think it'll tarnish memories of the original, but if you look at previous RE remakes, none of them replace the original games, they only bring them a new sheen for contemporary audiences. RE4 will likely follow the same lead, only this time it isn't wholly necessary. Perhaps RE5 and RE6 remakes will follow afterwards, because that's what we seem to be heading for. We shouldn't worry about the RE4 remake though, it should see a commendable upgrade, even if it won't replace the brilliance of the original-it shall only add to its legacy.